How to pack a healthy school lunch

Advertising Save Money

I was fortunate enough to be sent some fantastic school lunch box options for my children and I including insulated lunch bags, nude food movers, containers for sandwiches, crackers, veggie sticks and dip, sauce containers and more. We eat mostly slow carb, according to the 4 hour body, although my daughters have a wider variety than I do.

Because we eat this way, there is more preparation and more containers or gladwrap needed. Hence why we are loving the new range from Smash, pictured below.

See the pink lunch box here?

Smash, back to school supplies

My 6yr old pounced on it and fell in love immediately. In fact, the next morning she proudly declared “I slept with my lunchbox, it was like my teddybear.”
(To be clear, this kid has 5 pillows, numerous stuffed animals and no lack of other comforts! Yet, chose the lunchbox.)

She has taken it pretty much everywhere since we got it. It has a container inside for crackers or yoghurt and is section into 3 with one small section the perfect size for an apple and the yoghurt container, then the other section has a lift out divider for a sandwich and whatever else we put in. It is also encased in a detachable insulated bag, for easy cleaning.

Some of my other favourite containers are the dip and stick one, the mini sauce ones and the enviro boxes are brilliant with space for a sandwich, a few pieces of fruit and some other snacks.

What can you put in a healthy lunch box?
Some of the things we have in our lunches include:
Veggie sticks: carrot, cucumber, celery, capsicum, zucchini, or florets of broccoli and cauliflower are good too.
Fruit: berries, cut up kiwi fruit, watermelon, rockmelon, oranges, whole apples or pears, grapes, banana’s or even a fruit salad. Any fruit that is in season gets put in their lunch. Cheery tomatoes are a fruit, so I will list there here. Obviously, don’t add them to a fruit salad!
Dairy: we limit dairy so sometimes it is a cheese stick or cheese slices, cheese sandwich or greek yoghurt.
Dips: hummus, guacamole and beetroot dip are the two favourites. I prefer to make my own dips to ensure they are sugar free.
Protein: ham, boiled eggs, cooked meat such as chicken breast or roasts can be great if your kids eat them cold. Mine do not.
Sandwich alternatives: wraps with salad, vegetables, meat, eggs, anything your kids like, a whole salad where they can choose what goes into it, nachos with corn chips and salsa, rice paper rolls, sushi, healthy homemade pizza.
Other snacks: crackers, rice cakes, homemade treats where substitutes are made to reduce or exclude sugar, lower the fat content and increase healthy foods such as chia seeds, flax seeds, spinach, mashed vegetables etc. I don’t hide the food, the kids cook with me. They get to experiment, provide feedback and we tweak our recipes to suit our tastes.

My children don’t tend to like to eat food cold in their lunch box that would normally be eaten hot. As such, having a slow carb lunch box that aligns with how we eat isn’t easy. To adhere to the lifestyle we want, I focus on a really good breakfast, as healthy a lunchbox as I can then a really good dinner. My children are involved in the food preparation along the way, make choices on foods they like or don’t like, try new things and know that chocolate, ice-cream, cakes, biscuits, muffins etc are ‘sometimes’ foods.

As a result of being conscious of what we are eating, we are healthier, sleep better, learning faster and moods are even instead of behavioural issues we were previously experiencing.

The range we got from Smash makes it so easy for my kids to pack their own lunches from our selection of foods, have everything separated, saves me money, reduces waste such as plastic wrap and my kids have been using them for road trips, a few festivals we have been to and packing their own lunch on any family outing.

They are hardy, come in a great range of style and colours, fit in the school bag nicely and keep lunch fresh.

What lunch boxes do you use and what do you put in your kids lunch?

 

Leave a Reply